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Poem Collection - The Greatest Poems of All Time
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  the first time the emperor Han heard a certain Word he said, “It is strange.” The second time he said, “It is divine.” The third time he said, “Let the speaker be put to death.”
  the exquisite painter Ko-tsu was often reproached by an industrious friend for his fits of idleness. At last he excused himself by saying, “You are a watermill—a windmill can grind only when the wind blows.”
  a kite, while devouring a skylark, complained, “Had I known that thy flesh was no sweeter than that of a sparrow I should have listened longer to thy delicious notes.”
  to the passionate lover, whose sighs come back to him on every breeze, all the world is like a murmuring sea-shell.
  the child who threw away leaf after leaf of the many-coated onion, to get to the sweet heart, found in the end that he had thrown away the heart itself.
  my mother taught me that every night a procession of junks carrying lanterns moves silently across the sky, and the water sprinkled from their paddles falls to the earth in the form of dew. I no longer believe that the stars are junks carrying lanterns, no longer that the dew is shaken from their oars.
  the emperors of fourteen dynasties, clad in robes of yellow silk embroidered with the Dragon, wearing gold diadems set with pearls and rubies, and seated on thrones of incomparable ivory, have ruled over the Middle Kingdom for four thousand years.
  the sailor boy who leant over the side of the Junk of Many Pearls, and combed the green tresses of the sea with his ivory fingers, believing that he had heard the voice of a mermaid, cast his body down between the waves.
  even as the seed of the marigold, carried by the wind, lodges on the roofs of palaces, and lights the air with flame-colored blossoms, so may the child-like words of the insignificant poet confer honor on lofty and disdainful mandarins.
  i have heard that a certain princess, when she found that she had been married by a demon, wove a wreath of jonquils and sent it to the lover of former days.
  a poet, having taken the bridle off his tongue, spoke thus: “More fragrant than the heliotrope, which blooms all the year round, better than vermilion letters on tablets of sendal, are thy kisses, thou shy one!”
  some one complained to the Master, “After many lessons I do not fully understand your doctrine.” In response the Master pointed to the tide in the mouth of the river, and asked, “How wide is the as in this place?”
  the poet Wong, after he had delighted a company of mandarins at a feast, sat silent in the midst of his household. He explained, “The diamond sparkles only when it is in the light.”
  the coral fisher, who had been a long time beneath the water, rose to the surface with nothing in his hand but a spray of crimson seaweed. In answer to the master of the junk he said, “While I was in the world of fishes this miserable weed appeared to me more beautiful than coral.”
  meditating on the glory of illustrious lineage I lifted up my eyes and beheld the bitter purple willows growing round the tombs of the exalted Mings.
  the aged man, when he beheld winter approaching, counted the leaves as they lapsed from the acacia trees; while his son was talking of the spring.
 <–710  :previousnext  
 <–649  :previousnext  
 <–526  :previousnext  
Canto I.Canto II.Canto III.Canto IV.Canto V.

To pay his ransom man must toil With Reason's implement alone To plough and rake and free from stone
A few thorns or a meagre flower,Continually a heavy shower
And on that last and terrible dayThe wrath of the stern judge to stay,
Recesses swell with ripened grain,And blooms whose shapes and hues will gain
proper
All fled? Yet one
One
these
all
when was man by God forgot?
This comes of reading books:
This comes of writing poetry.
Hygeian harp, whose magic rul'dDyspepsia
callisthenics
apotheosis
Whether
[1]
[2]

This
Nor more in the water she laves,
And stiffen'd to crystal the waves.
By the fire-side a merry young grig;
And at night leads us out to a jig.
Encounter the keen arctic wind;
And Pleasure untainted you'll find.
But then she appears in great state;
While Envy and Pride on her wait.
The Colonel may seek her in blood;
That she's born and resides in the wood.
Note
Brief Commentary
Tis stratagem alone thy life has freed:
  * * *
[4]
 An Epitaph
<Publ. 1872>
<Publ. 1846>
To
* * *
[4]
5
[5]
10Hell smile like a Cherub & say[6]
[7]
Legacy
'T was

Au jana! Aua! Oha! Haq!
And the loaded dog-teams go;And the wives can hear their men come back,
Back from the edge of the floe!
Shoal! 'Ware shoal!
verbatim
[3]
[1]
[2]
On F—— & S——
⁠10
⁠20
⁠30
⁠40
⁠50
⁠60
⁠70
⁠80
⁠90
⁠100
⁠110
⁠120
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⁠140
⁠150
⁠160
⁠170
⁠180
⁠190
⁠200
⁠210
⁠220
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⁠240
⁠250
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⁠270
⁠280
⁠290
⁠300
⁠310
⁠320
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⁠350
⁠360
⁠370
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⁠390
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⁠410
⁠420
⁠430
⁠440
⁠450
⁠460
⁠470
⁠480
⁠490
⁠500
⁠510
⁠520
⁠530
⁠540
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⁠570
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⁠590
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⁠630
⁠640
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⁠690
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⁠730
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⁠790
⁠800
<1876>


* * *There was an Old Man in a tree, Who was horribly bored by a Bee; When they said, 'Does it buzz?' He replied, 'Yes, it does!' 'It's a regular brute of a Bee!' <Publ. 1846>
O
Female
alone,
single Passion
Tallboy's breeches, and Caesar's
dreamed
I am
Here
* * *There was on Old Man of the Isles,Whose face was pervaded with smiles;He sung high dum diddle,And played on the fiddle,That amiable Man of the Isles.
   PETER (says Pope
Peter
'Tis
To F——
INFANT SORROW
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
this
*
[3]
o][4]
(The Everlasting Gospel , fragment "j" 50-51) Versions written elsewhere in the MS. Book:
(The Everlasting Gospel, deleted in fragment "k" )
(The Everlasting Gospel, deleted in fragment "k" )
(The Everlasting Gospel, deleted in fragment "k" )
(The Everlasting Gospel, fragment "k" 91-92)
* * *There was an Old Person of Leeds, Whose head was infested with beads; She sat on a stool, And ate gooseberry fool, Which agreed with that person of Leeds.
* * *
Pub. 1846
Tis the lady Jingly Jones!


<1877>
(The original text) * * *
must
Admiral Lynch
S
his heart, or find my own
   DAME Chastity
King Brute; [1]
Greenland
Queen Anne;
Miss Cynthia, [2]
Jove
Jupiter
Greeks [5]
Astrea
[6]
Tisiphone [7]
Thames
Ursidius
nem. con
crim. con
[8]
[9]
Latinus' closet, [10]
Guildhall
[11]
Ceres
Iberine
Bath and Tunbridge
Flanders? [12]
Mall [13]
Bathyllus
Tuccy regulate her glances? Appula chuckles, and poor Thomyly
by Desire, [14]
[15]
Barthol'mew
Trin
Clive and Woffington's
Fle—w—d's
Italian measures while Fausan
Ælia languishes in vain;Fausan
B—rd
Hispulla sighs for Buskin's
Lyt—n or P—t
Fig. [16]Hippia, [17]
C—r's [18]
[19]
Bay of Biscay
Spanish
Tis hard to clamber up the sides;
Hippia
Sergy
[20]
Sergius
Pamela;
Harry's wife [21]
Ch–rl–s Street
capuchin
H—d's [22]
Kitten; [23]
come down the ready. [24]
[25]
Cesennia's
that merit she abounds. Venus
Bibula doth Sertorius
[26]
Italian vines, and Spanish sheep. [27]
[28]
Pit's
Lewis Fifteen
Agrippa gave his sister. [29]
Jew
West Indies ta'en — away. [30]
Pæan
Amphion's
[31]
Latona
[32]
Frenchified [33]
Parisian
English
French
Bowyer's grammar? Mon ame, mon Mignon!
Lord Fanny
Tom Brown
Tom
[34]
Wasey, Hoadley, Hulse
Manilia's
litigation
Dr–per
Madam Sutton, Mrs. Stokes
[35]
Cock
Of those superb fine horseman's suits, And those magnificent jack-boots
John
Hyde Park
Hampden, Baynton, Hollis? [36]
Murray, or what Henley
tis true;
British
Armada frighten'd Kent
Queen Bessy
France
French finery, Italian
German drunkenness, Dutch
Nile
English ladies, the Latin
Exultation
On S——
A Lay Sung at the Banquet in the Capitol, on the Day WhereonManius Curius Dentatus, a Second Time Consul, Triumphed Over KingPyrrhus and the Tarentines, in the Year of the City CCCCLXXIX.
The Goat.
The Oxen.
The Elephant.
Pigs and Buffaloes.
God
Apparently

10And Worshippd them that they might make[4]
⁠BUSY old fool, unruly Sun,⁠
⁠Saucy pedantic wretch, go chide⁠Late school-boys and sour prentices,⁠Go tell court-huntsmen that the king will ride,⁠
⁠Thy beams so reverend, and strong⁠
⁠If her eyes have not blinded thine,⁠Look, and to-morrow late tell me,⁠Whether both th' Indias of spice and mine⁠
⁠She's all states, and all princes I;⁠
⁠Thou, Sun, art half as happy as we,⁠In that the world's contracted thus;⁠Thine age asks ease, and since thy duties be⁠
 Another
the same
<Publ. 1846>
Perhaps
Europe
With a Fa la
Britons
Spaniard
Orpheus
The Angel[1]
del.
116
120
124
128
Long
Departed
Mat Prior's
chien sçavant
en passant
Fair is the sun when first he flames above,Flinging his joy down in a happy beam;
The sunset far more glorious than a dream.
In the sun’s eye swoon like one trembling heart—
To catch at least one ray ere it fall!
Mist and gloom fall, and terrors glide between,
Bruise the cold snail and crawling toad unseen.
WHOEVER comes to shroud me, do not harm,⁠
               I
II
III
Rosalie
Holy Thursday[1]
see!
Microscopes
Vesuvius
Vitruvius
<Publ. 1846>
The
is
SO, so, break off this last lamenting kiss,⁠
I asked
Chorus
Jenny's
condescend to be our guest;
Bleed, yet here secure we rest.
Playing thro' the waving trees;
To participate our bliss.
Here with looks ferocious stood;
Stain'd the grass with human blood.
Rolling thro' the blooming wild,
Mourn'd, while desolation smil'd.
Struck to heav'n a heat intense;
Wonders of Omnipotence.
And th' Aborigines were fled,
Now return'd to bless the shade.
From sad Terra's black'ned brow,
Roofs his cot, late levell'd low.
Bursting flow'rs exhale perfume;
Cast again a cooling gloom.
Roll again unmix'd with gore,
Fall beneath with solemn roar.
Cheerful all our hours are spent;
Sylvan joys are innocent.
Beneath this midnight shade;
And tread the lonely glade.
While tears incessant flow;
Till Grief melodious grow.
For sorrow only made,
The silent glooms pervade.
Not such the calmness there,
'Midst billows of despair.
My soul rejects with scorn;
She'd rather chuse to mourn
Or for extreme despair:
Why should she triumph here?
Yet Grace must lead us thence;
The idle joys of Sense.
Of Nature to remain,
Then welcome day again.
Jesus
Jane
Navarre?
Parr?
Maria, William'
Suffolk
Warwick
Armyne'
Brooke
Vere! and, Langham!
Hobart?
Courten
Hoghton, Ratcliffe, Hastings
Bretterg, Cutts, and Andrews
Lucy'
Baynard, Rowe, Burnet, Bury, in your praiseFame founds her trump, proud of th' immortal themes;Genius and Virtue
Russell
Askewe, ev'n in Gard'ner'
Humility
Eve
Vanity's fantastic round,Cards, dice, songs, dances, masquerades, and plays?
Jane, or Farr, or Mary
Charlotte, Albion'
how good? Rash muse, bear,How good
[unfinished]
The
⁠UPON this Primrose hill,⁠
⁠Make a terrestrial galaxy,⁠
⁠Yet know I not, which flower⁠
⁠All thought of sex, and think to move⁠
⁠Live, primrose, then, and thrive⁠
⁠Belongs to each woman, then⁠
we
his
pianos like fortes
So
A drop
Anson's
⁠810
⁠820
⁠830
⁠840
⁠850
⁠860
⁠870
⁠880
⁠890
⁠900
Blasted with sighs, and surrounded with tears,⁠
⁠Receive such balms as else cure every thing.⁠
⁠These trees to laugh and mock me to my face;⁠
⁠For all are false, that taste not just like mine.⁠
Shoal! 'Ware shoal!
  * * *
To H
25
40
45
50
On the Virginity of the Virgin Mary & Johanna Southcott
Thou
How
   WHEN JOVE with fair Alcmena
Celia's
To F——
Riches
I've
Several Questions Answerd
sleep
dead'." A smothered hiss,
My
Introduction.
[3]
 How
I hide
You
I.L
Breath
Arms
Blood
Balm
Air
Silence
Shade
Air,Stol'n
Fluid Folds, his visionary Shape
Angels cull the thinnest Air
Bliss
Angels
Accents
<Publ. 1846>
keep your hands down
*
A Bard's Epitaph1786
What
peasant's nest
Companion
to die, to die
Great First Cause
Imitation of Pope A Compliment to the Ladies
In
I came
His
⁠Dispute, and conquer, if I would;⁠
[2] on the "Never",[3]
[5] or "stuffing",[6]
[7]

I must
I trust.
To hope.The rope
Louis "David" Riel
———
Louis "David" Riel
  English Encouragement of Art [First reading]
English Encouragement of Art[Final reading]Cromeks opinions put into Rhyme

That
éclat
Some
[2]
Pr[ophetess].
O[din].
Pr.
O.
Celia
Quadrille. P—lt—y
W—lp-le
Lilliputian
France!
Peruvian
India
[4]5 And when it smells of the Lamp we can[5]
Greece
India's gem on Scotland's
Peruvian ore enrich the Cornish
May
cynic
cynic's
Philip
Alexander
Philip's
Mahomet
Churchill
Cæsar
Tully to him, and Seneca
Dryden's
Virgil's
Sir B
B—nard and H—cote
Cheapside
Argyle
Gothic
W—'s
Young
Mæcenas you in no Augustan
Dodington
Cælia's
Booth
Handel's
its
Hoadley
Carteret
Lee
Chesterfield
Littelton
I begged
Whose charms the world surprise,
Are wafted to the skies,
Where'er the light barque moves,
From out their sea-girt groves.
And calls out from afar,
'She drove her pearly car.'
And there confin'd to roar:
'Till Susan comes on shore.'
4] [This world del.] Each Man is in [the del.
3
1] [Until del.] When [the del.
2] And cast [the del.
Glee
twelve
No
Belshazzar
Like
If
Much
⁠910
⁠920
⁠930
⁠940
⁠950
⁠960
⁠970
⁠980
⁠990
⁠1000
⁠1010
⁠1020
WHilst you, Athenia
Athenia
Asia
Assyrian
Persia
th' unalterable law
Mahomet
Tangier
Tartar's
Greece too not exempt, Greece
Athenian matron, and the Spartan
Rome too Liberty once reign'd, in Rome
Cannæ's
dead?
fled?
   }{\displaystyle \scriptstyle {\left.{\begin{matrix}\ \\\\\ \ \end{matrix}}\right\}\,}}
Britain
Britannia
a learned wife.
Athenia's
he
her!
dost—I am
*
Into
Safe
saltpetre
Yusufzaies
jezail
Crammer
tulwar
Kurrum Valley
Afridis
⁠Him, only for his purse⁠
⁠May he be scorn'd by one, whom all else scorn,⁠Forswear to others, what to her he hath sworn,⁠
⁠And may he feel no touch⁠
⁠Or may he for her virtue reverence⁠One that hates him only for impotence,⁠
⁠And no record tell why;⁠
⁠Or may he so long parasites have fed,⁠That he would fain be theirs whom he hath bred,⁠
⁠What plants, mine, beasts, fowl, fish,⁠
⁠Be annex'd in schedules unto this by me,⁠Fall on that man; For if it be a she⁠
* * *There was an Old Person of Cadiz,Who was always polite to all ladies;But in handing his daughter,He fell into the water,Which drowned that Old Person of Cadiz.
To Nancy F——
[ plate m ]
Oulus shows a gen'rous fire; Lucretia
Helen
Oulus
Corinna's

FABLE VIII.
15“Unfit for tinder, lint or fodder
20Begar me give you coup de grace
[4] may deign50
55Perhaps our great Augustan Gray[6]
[7], may I owe to you?60
65
70
   THAT Kate
Their pinions clogg'd with dirt;
But gravitate to earth.
To guide them to new spheres;
Of heavenly gace appears.
And sink into the tombs;
The melancholy rooms:
The vicious and the just;
One rots beneath a bust.
Pil'd up along the walls!
Of his tremendous halls
Still drops a mould'ring tear;
And lays the carcase bare.
Once more the blooming fair;
A vile impostor there.
And vainly deified,
(How humbling to our pride!)
Just born to view the day,
To filth and dust decay.
Sounds deeply in my ear,
'Thy final scene is here.'
Not till the clarion's sound
From the refunding ground:
Th' immutable decree,
I pass eternity.
And can but clay detain;
And scorns his servile chain.
At graves, and shrouds, and worms,
Inhabit angel forms.
Around me lie withered and dead;
Were but meteors whose brightness misled;
Like the mists of the morning have fled.
Like the night-scented jasmin it gleams;
One light pure and hallowed still beams;
As that I have yearned for in dreams.
That bound me in friendship's bright chain;
To blind or to charm me again;
With a sorrow I would were disdain.
From the cold and void ether above;
O'er the waste flew the wandering dove;
I return to the ark of thy love.
Here my heart's strongest tendrils entwine;
It lays on earth's holiest shrine:
Of the life thou hast given from thine.
That sweep over life's stormy sea,
They were winged with no terror for me;
If I trembled---it was but for thee.
In silence or sleep in the breast,
Is charmed by the sunshine to rest;
Are its harmonies only expressed.
In the strife with the world's rushing throng;
As borne by its current along;
And uttered these fragments of song.
For which time has no place and no name;
Might I seek for the guerdon of fame---
I would twine them around thy loved name.
And spreads o'er thy brow and thy cheek;
My strong heart grows nerveless and weak;
The blow beneath which it would break.
Though our loved and our lost, gone before,
And call thee away to that shore;
Leave, leave me not yet, I implore!
When thy bitterest draught would be thrown;
Heart with heart, life with life that have grown!
And tread its dark wine-press alone.
⁠Which is, to keep that hid.
Thee
 
FABLE XVI.
"La vie est un sommeil, l'amour en est le rêve;."
When the low heavy sky weighs like a lidUpon the spirit aching for the light
By a black day sadder than any night;
Where batlike Hope goes blindly fluttering
Bruises his tender head and timid wing;
Straight, rigid pillars of the endless rain,
Their meshes in the caverns of the brain,—
Hurling a hideous uproar to the sky
Through the strange heavens, wailing stubbornly.
File slowly through my soul; crushed, sorrowful,
Plants his black banner on my drooping skull.
<Publ. 1872>
MS. 1st rdg. del.
   MISS Molly
Exceptions to rules even Lilly allows; Moll has sure an example
  To English Connoisseurs

  • Introduction
  • Prefatory Note
  • Olympian Odes
  • The Pythian Odes
  • The Nemean Odes
  • The Isthmian Odes
  • Fragments
  • Errata
  • My Mary!
    adagio and andante
    Angels

    Blake manuscript - Notebook - page 063

    Blakes apology for his Catalogue
    Over
    ⁠WHEN my grave is broke up again⁠Some second guest to entertain,⁠—For graves have learn'd that woman-head,⁠To be to more than one a bed—⁠

    ⁠If this fall in a time, or land,⁠Where mass-devotion doth command,⁠Then he that digs us up will bring⁠Us to the bishop or the king,⁠
    ⁠First we loved well and faithfully,⁠Yet knew not what we loved, nor why;⁠Difference of sex we never knew,⁠No more than guardian angels do;⁠

       To Rosalinda
    Thalia's pow'rs; Alexis
    Alexis
    Rosalinda's
    Rosalind
    Paxton
    Roman
    Eve's
    Versailles
    Alexis'
    An ancient Burrough in the West[1]
    [10]
    [12]
    [13]
    Quies in Caelo
    I know your heart, which overflowsWith outworn loves long cast aside,
    A damnèd soul's unbending pride;
    Reflect the leaping flames of hell;
    And love cold steel and powder well;
    And feel for every man distrust,
    Of Irresistible Disgust.
    When you awaken shuddering,
    "I am your equal, O my King!"

    *
    Destruction
    thee
    Vices as glaring as the noon-day sun,
    BURDETT
    Franklin
    Pitt
    one
    Oblivion marks the murdering poor man’s tomb,
    Kings are but men,
    Napoleon
      LET it not Celia's
    Gay
    On the Great Encouragement Given by English Nobility & Gentry to Correggio Rubens Rembrandt Reynolds Gainsborough Catalani DuCrowe & Dilberry Doodle
    Have
    Brewster
    Within
    * * *There was a Young Lady whose chin, Resembled the point of a pin; So she had it made sharp, And purchased a harp, And played several tunes with her chin. <Publ. 1846>
    I never
    No lover saith, I love, nor any other⁠
    <Publ. 1846>
    A Book was writ of late call'd Tetrachordon
    Quintilian
    John Cheek
    Cambridge, and King Edward
    Florentine Ingratitude
    25 These Verses were written by a very Envious Man[8]
    I died
    "Glide soft", ye Silver Floods"
    Version 1
    As if I asked a common alms -And in my wondering hand,A stranger pressed a kingdom -And I - bewildered stand -As if I asked the OrientHad it for me a morn?And it sh'd lift it's purple dikesAnd flood me with the Dawn!
    Version 2
    The "hand you stretch me in the Dark", I put mine in, and turn away - I have no Saxon, now -As if I asked a common Alms,And in my wondering handA Stranger pressed a Kingdom,And I, bewildered, stand -As if I asked the OrientHad it for me a Morn -And it should lift its purple Dikes,And shatter Me with Dawn!
    Version 3
    Thank you for the Grave - empty and full - too -As if I asked a common Alms and in my wondering HandA stranger pressed a Kingdom, and I bewildered stand,As if I asked the Orient had it for me a Morn,And it should lift it's purple Dikes, and shatter me with Dawn -

    As if I asked a common Alms -And in my wondering handA Stranger pressed a Kingdom,And I, bewildered, stand -As if I asked the OrientHad it for me a Morn -And it should lift its purple Dikes,And shatter Me with Dawn!
    Who hear'st the faintest pray'r
    Which round thee hymned are.
    I humbly bow the knee,
    An interest in thee.
    And rushes to the croud;
    Tho' conscience warns aloud.
    To every ill how prone?
    Insensible as stone?
    Nor will resist the steel;
    My flinty bosom feel.
    And tumbling to hell's glooms
    To "where Hope never comes."
    Thro' fertile vales has play'd;
    Demands immortal aid.
    To the supremely blest;
    Was plac'd above the rest.
    The blushing flow'rs arise;
    And warms the orient skies.
    I might obey him too;
    From whom my breath I drew.
    I'll venture to thy seat;
    And tear me from thy feet.
    I'll tell thee now (dear love) what thou shalt do⁠To anger destiny, as she doth us;⁠
    ⁠How thine may out-endure⁠Sibyl's glory, and obscure⁠
    ⁠Of letters, which have past 'twixt thee and me;⁠
    ⁠Rule and example found;⁠There the faith of any ground⁠
    ⁠Or as the world's form, this all-gravèd tome⁠
    ⁠When this book is made thus,⁠Should again the ravenous⁠
    ⁠Is love or wonder—may find all they seek,⁠
    ⁠Or, loth so to amuse⁠Faith's infirmity, they choose⁠
    ⁠Both by what titles mistresses are ours,⁠
    ⁠Who, though from heart and eyes,⁠They exact great subsidies,⁠
    ⁠May of their occupation find the grounds;⁠
    ⁠In both they do excel⁠Who the present govern well,⁠
    ⁠As he removes far off, that great heights takes;⁠
    ⁠To take a latitude⁠Sun, or stars, are fitliest view'd⁠
    J—n W—ts
    Men are mad who write in such an age
    Not so
    The poet's only dull, the printer's mad
    20There they Shine Eternally
    To whom pour out my tears
    The ruler of the spheres?
    To stop my spirit's flight;
    Just lets in Reason's light.
    Clings fondly round my neck,
    Its tender fibres break.
    The silken tye of love?
    Real miseries to prove?
    1. In the bleak mid-winter Frosty wind made moan,
    Water like a stone;
    Snow on snow,
    Long ago.
    Nor earth sustain;
    When He comes to reign:
    A stable-place sufficed
    Jesus Christ.
    Worship night and day,
    And a mangerful of hay;
    Fall down before,
    Which adore.
    May have gathered there,
    Thronged the air;
    In her maiden bliss,
    With a kiss.
    Poor as I am?
    I would bring a lamb,
    I would do my part,
    Give my heart.
       CAN there on earth, my Celia
       THAT Varius
    Codrus
    Horace
    Titian
    Quin's or Garrick's
    Quin
    Quin again, who Cato
    Eternity
    Straffords, and the Duke of Norfolks
    Bentley to the Grub Street Journal
    Dennis
    Bavius up to Tommy Gordon
    Boheme to Booth
    Robed in a silken robe that shines and shakes, She seems to dance whene'er she treads the sod,
    Dance to the waving cadence of a rod.
    Insensible to mortal grief and strife;
    She folds indifference round her budding life.
    Gloriana's
    Sloan
    Corinth
    M—h
    India sends to Spain
    [1]
    PHOEBUS
    * * *There was an Old Man with a flute, A sarpint ran into his boot; But he played daay and night, Till the sarpint took flight, And avoided that man with a flute. <Publ. 1846>
    del.] [lustful del.
    Hymettos
    Hymettian
    But she seized on the cat, And said, 'Granny, burn that!

    I.
    ON
    II.
    III.
    IV.
    V.
    VI.
    "No goose that swims, but soon or late" "Will find some gander for a mate."
    The Kid
    [4]
    In
    "
    . . . . .
    WHERE, like a pillow on a bed,⁠
    At
    ⁠Yet this enjoys before it woo,⁠And pamper'd swells with one blood made of two;⁠
    ⁠Though use make you apt to kill me,⁠Let not to that self-murder added be,⁠
    ⁠'Tis true; then learn how false fears be;⁠Just so much honour, when thou yield'st to me,⁠
    To-day
    him
    CHORUS For auld lang syne, my dear, for auld lang syne, we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet, for auld lang syne.
    CHORUS
    To Venetian Artists

    Blake manuscript - Notebook - page 061
    That God is Colouring Newton does shew[4]
    As
    When
    There was an Old Man of Kilkenny, Who never had more than a penny; He spent all that money, In onions and honey, That wayward Old Man of Kilkenny.
    Cumberland's
    Congress
    Cumberland
    Minnesota and Roanoke
    Monitor
    Merrimac's
    New
    It
    Soul
    Announcing the visit of spring;
    How gleefully all the birds sing!
    Nor let blushing Flora complain,
    Had blasted the promising gem.
    Now shoots out a diffident bud;
    Ye kill this bright child of the wood:
    The groves we now safely explore
    Were shelter'd and aw'd as before.
    Whose seven years sabbath concludes,
    Is chas'd to Canadia's deep woods.
    But laughs and is jocund as we;
    Carve 'Washington,' on every tree.
    And drop in its current the line,
    Ah, no! 'tis an evil design.
    Which I can destroy, but not give;
    To bid a poor being not live.
    Are changeably ting'd by the light;
    Presents a new heaven to sight.
    With plumage just dipt in rich dies;
    There, see the freed bird how it flies!
    Too far from our cottage we roam;
    Come, Daphne, come let us go home.
    I like
    tea
    pippin
    From off my father's tree!
    india rubbers
    wind
    gravitation, stumbling
    Fell from an apple tree!
    gymnastic
    In honor of the sun!
    was
    Insolvency, sublime
    Our Fathers being weary,
    immortal hero
    There was an Old Person of Ischia,Whose conduct grew friskier and friskier;He dance hornpipes and jigs,And ate thousands of figs,That lively Old Person of Ischia.
    I
    First Man
    Next, Please
    Third Man
    Fourth Man
    The Last Straw
    She
    Lexington
    FOR God's sake hold your tongue, and let me love;⁠Or chide my palsy, or my gout;⁠
    ⁠Take you a course, get you a place,⁠
    ⁠Contemplate; what you will, approve,⁠
    ⁠What merchant's ships have my sighs drown'd?⁠
    ⁠When did the heats which my veins fill⁠
    ⁠Litigious men, which quarrels move,⁠
    ⁠Call her one, me another fly,⁠
    ⁠The phoenix riddle hath more wit⁠
    ⁠We die and rise the same, and prove⁠
    ⁠And if unfit for tomb or hearse⁠
    ⁠We'll build in sonnets pretty rooms;⁠
    ⁠And by these hymns, all shall approve⁠
    ⁠Made one another's hermitage;⁠
    ⁠Into the glasses of your eyes;⁠
    ⁠Countries, towns, courts beg from above⁠
    The Sail
    The
    ⁠BEFORE I sigh my last gasp, let me breathe,⁠Great Love, some legacies; I here bequeath⁠Mine eyes to Argus, if mine eyes can see;⁠If they be blind, then, Love, I give them thee;⁠My tongue to Fame; to ambassadors mine ears;⁠To women, or the sea, my tears;⁠Thou, Love, hast taught me heretofore⁠
    ⁠My constancy I to the planets give;⁠My truth to them who at the court do live;⁠My ingenuity and openness,⁠To Jesuits; to buffoons my pensiveness;⁠My silence to any, who abroad hath been;⁠My money to a Capuchin:⁠Thou, Love, taught'st me, by appointing me⁠
    ⁠My faith I give to Roman Catholics;⁠All my good works unto the Schismatics⁠Of Amsterdam; my best civility⁠And courtship to an University;⁠My modesty I give to soldiers bare;⁠My patience let gamesters share:⁠Thou, Love, taught'st me, by making me⁠
    ⁠I give my reputation to those⁠Which were my friends; mine industry to foes;⁠To schoolmen I bequeath my doubtfulness;⁠My sickness to physicians, or excess;⁠To nature all that I in rhyme have writ;⁠And to my company my wit:⁠Thou, Love, by making me adore⁠
    ⁠To him for whom the passing-bell next tolls,⁠I give my physic books; my written rolls⁠Of moral counsels I to Bedlam give;⁠My brazen medals unto them which live⁠In want of bread; to them which pass among⁠All foreigners, mine English tongue:⁠Though, Love, by making me love one⁠
    ⁠Therefore I'll give no more, but I'll undo⁠The world by dying, because love dies too.⁠Then all your beauties will be no more worth⁠Than gold in mines, where none doth draw it forth;⁠And all your graces no more use shall have,⁠Than a sun-dial in a grave:⁠Thou, Love, taught'st me by making me⁠
    POET
    SCULPTOR
    PAINTER
    RT
    WHEN I am dead, and doctors know not why,⁠
    ⁠You think a sudden damp of love⁠

    ⁠And like a Goth and Vandal rise,⁠
    ⁠Kill me as woman, let me die⁠
    He sate on the stairs, Eating apples and pears,
       WHAT is good-nature? Gen'rous Richmond
    Marlborough
    Irus falls from Dives'
    Shaftsb'ry's
    Clarinda's
    Richmond's
    Mountford's
    Ch—d

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